Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

PLAIN FACTS FOR OLD AND YOUNG. 

 

BY 

 

J. H. KELLOGG, M.D., 

 

MEMBER AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION, AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE 

ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MICROSCOPY, MEMBER MICH. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BATTLE CREEK 

SANITARIUM, AUTHOR OF NUMEROUS WORKS ON HEALTH, ETC. 

 

 

 

 

PUBLISHED BY 

SEGNER & CONDIT, 

BURLINGTON, IOWA. 

1881. 

 

 

 

 

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1879, by 

J. H. KELLOGG, M.D., 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington, D.C. 

 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

 

 

 

 

PREFACE. 

 

 

The publishers of this work offer no apology for presenting it to the 

reading public, since the wide prevalence of the evils which it exposes 

is sufficient warrant for its publication. The subjects with which it 

deals are of vital consequence to the human race; and it is of the utmost 

importance that every effort should be made to dispel the gross 

ignorance which almost universally prevails, by the wide diffusion, 

in a proper manner, of information of the character contained in this 

volume. 

 

This book has been written not for the young only, nor for any single 

class of persons, but for all who are old enough to be capable of 

understanding and appreciating it. The prime object of its preparation 

has been to call attention to the great prevalence of sexual excesses 

of all kinds, and the heinous crimes resulting from some forms of sexual 

transgression, and to point out the terrible results which inevitably 

follow the violation of sexual law. 

 

In order to make more clear and comprehensible the teachings of nature 

respecting the laws regulating the sexual function, and the evils 

resulting from their violation, it has seemed necessary to preface the 

practical part of the subject by a concise description of the anatomy 

of reproduction. In this portion of the work especial pains has been 

taken to avoid anything like indelicacy of expression, yet it has not 

been deemed advisable to sacrifice perspicuity of ideas to any prudish 

notions of modesty. It is hoped that the reader will bear in mind that 

the language of science is always chaste in itself, and that it is only 

through a corrupt imagination that it becomes invested with impurity. 

The author has constantly endeavored to impart information in the most 

straightforward, simple, and concise manner. 

 

The work should be judiciously circulated, and to secure this the 

publishers will take care to place it in the hands of agents competent 

to introduce it with discretion; yet it may be read without injury by 

any one who is sufficiently mature to understand it. Great care has 

been taken to exclude from its pages those accounts of the habits of 

vicious persons, and descriptions of the mechanical accessories of vice, 

with which many works upon sexual subjects abound. 

 

The first editions of the work were issued with no little anxiety on 

the part of both author and publishers as to how it would be received 

by the reading public. It was anticipated that no little adverse 

criticism, and perhaps severe condemnation, would be pronounced by many 


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