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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

been written, much to no purpose other than the multiplication of books. 

We shall devote no space to consideration of the origin of the 

institution, its expediency, or varied relations, as these topics are 

foreign to the character of this work. 

 

The primary object of marriage was, undoubtedly, the preservation of 

the race, though there are other objects which, under special 

circumstances, may become paramount even to this. These latter we 

cannot consider, as only the relations of the reproductive functions 

in marriage come properly within our province. 

 

The first physiological question to be considered is concerning the 

proper age for marriage. 

 

Time to Marry.--Physiology fixes with accuracy the earliest period at 

which marriage is admissible. This period is that at which the body 

attains complete development, which is not before twenty in the female, 

and twenty-four in the male. Even though the growth may be completed 

before these ages, ossification of the bones is not fully effected, 

so that development is incomplete. 

 

Among most modern nations, the civil laws fixing the earliest date of 

marriage seem to have been made without any reference to physiology, 

or with the mistaken notion that puberty and nubility are identical. 

It is interesting to note the different ages established by different 

nations for the entrance of the married state. The degenerating Romans 

fixed the ages of legal marriage at thirteen for females, and fifteen 

for males. The Grecian legislator, Lycurgus, placed the ages at 

seventeen for the female, and thirty-seven for the male. Plato fixed 

the ages at twenty and thirty years. In Prussia, the respective ages 

are fifteen and nineteen; in Austria, sixteen and twenty; in France, 

sixteen and eighteen, respectively. 

 

Says Mayer, "In general, it may be established that the normal epoch 

for marriage is the twentieth year for women, and the twenty-fourth 

for men." 

 

Application of the Law of Heredity.--A moment's consideration of the 

physiology of heredity will disclose a sufficient reason why marriage 

should be deferred until the development of the body is wholly complete. 

The matrimonial relation implies reproduction. Reproduction is 

effected through the union of the ovum with the zoosperm. These elements, 

as we have already seen, are complete representatives of the 

individuals producing them, being composed--as supposed--of minute 

gemmules which are destined to be developed into cells and organs in 

the new being, each preserving its resemblance to the cell within the 

parent which produced it. The perfection of the new being, then, must 

be largely dependent on the integrity and perfection of the sexual 

elements. If the body is still incomplete, the reproductive elements 

must also be incomplete; and, in consequence, the progeny must be 

equally immature. 

 

Early Marriage.--The preceding paragraph contains a sufficient reason 

for condemning early marriage; that is, marriage before the ages 

mentioned. It is probable that even the ages of twenty and twenty-four 


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