Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

or follow her husband to a drunkard's grave. It is never safe for a 

woman to marry a man who has been for years an habitual drunkard, since 

he may relapse at any time; and the man who has only indulged moderately 

should be thoroughly reformed and tested before the chances are taken 

"for better or worse." Let him prove himself well first. A proposition 

to reform on condition of marriage should be dismissed with disdain. 

If a young man will not determine to do right because it is right, his 

motives are sordid; and the probability is very great that so soon as 

some stronger incentive appeals to his selfishness, he will forget his 

vows and promises and relapse into his former vices. 

 

Do Not Be in a Hurry.--In conclusion, perhaps we could give no more 

important advice than this: _Do not be in a hurry to marry._ There is 

little danger that this advice will do harm, for ten illustrations of 

the evil results of hasty marriage are seen to one in which the opposite 

mistake is made. It rarely happens that a marriage made without 

consideration and due deliberation on the part of both parties is a 

happy one in its results. There are exceptional cases in which this 

kind of matrimonial alliances result very satisfactorily; but these 

cases are quite exceptional. The business of selecting a partner for 

life, one who is expected to sustain the closest relation possible 

between human beings, who must be prepared to share in another's sorrows 

as well as joys, to sympathize with another's aspirations and 

appreciate another's motives and sentiments,--such a task is certainly 

one of the most serious of an individual's life and ought to be entered 

upon with calmness, deliberation, and unbiased judgment and entire 

self-control. When making a decision which must affect seriously an 

individual's whole life-time, passion, caprice, and all motives 

calculated to bias the judgment, should be laid aside. The happiness 

and usefulness of a whole life-time may be marred by a word. There is 

too much pending to be in a hurry. 

 

A certain philosopher once "compared a man about to marry to one who 

was about to put his hand into a sack in which were ninety-nine serpents 

and one eel; the moral of which is that there are ninety-nine chances 

to one against a fortunate selection." If this is true of a man about 

to marry, it is probably equally true that a woman under the same 

circumstances has nine hundred and ninety-nine chances against, for 

one in favor of, a fortunate selection. 


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