Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

 

Largely through the influence of Mr. Comstock, laws have been enacted 

which promise to do much toward checking this extensive evil, or at 

least causing it to make itself less prominent. Our newspapers still 

abound with advertisements of various so-called medical works, 

"Marriage Guides," etc., which are fruits of the same "upas-tree" that 

Mr. Comstock has labored so faithfully to uproot. 

 

It is a painful fact, however, that the total annihilation of every 

foul book which the law can reach will not effect the cure of this evil, 

for our modern literature is full of the same virus. It is necessarily 

presented in less grossly revolting forms, half concealed by beautiful 

imagery, or embellished by wit; but yet, there it is, and no law can 

reach it. The works of our standard authors in literature abound in 

lubricity. Popular novels have doubtless done more to arouse a prurient 

curiosity in the young, and to excite and foster passion and immorality, 

than even the obscene literature for the suppression of which such 

active measures have recently been taken. The more exquisitely painted 

the scenes of vice, the more dangerously enticing. Novel-reading has 

led thousands to lives of dissoluteness. 

 

Idleness.--This evil is usually combined with the preceding. To 

maintain purity, the mind must be occupied. If left without occupation, 

the vacuity is quickly filled with unchaste thoughts. Nothing can be 

worse for a child than to be reared in idleness. His morals will be 

certain to suffer. Incessant mental occupation is the only safeguard 

against unchastity. Those worthless fops who spend their lives in 

"killing time" by lounging about bar-rooms, loafing on street corners, 

or strutting up and down the boulevard, are anything but chaste. Those 

equally worthless young women who waste their lives on sofas or in 

easy-chairs, occupied only with some silly novel, or idling away life's 

precious hours in reverie--such creatures are seldom the models of 

purity one would wish to think them. If born with a natural propensity 

toward sin, such a life would soon engender a diseased, impure 

imagination, if nothing worse. 

 

Dress and Sensuality.--There are two ways in which fashionable dress 

leads to unchastity; viz., 1. By its extravagance; 2. By its abuse of 

the body. 

 

How does extravagance lead to unchastity? By creating the temptation 

to sin. It affects not those gorgeously attired ladies who ride in fine 

carriages, and live in brown-stone fronts, who are surrounded with all 

the luxuries that wealth can purchase--fine apparel is no temptation 

to such. But to less favored--though not less worthy--ones, these 

magnificent displays of millinery goods and fine trappings are most 

powerful temptations. The poor seamstress, who can earn by diligent 

toil hardly enough to pay her board bill, has no legitimate way by which 

to deck herself with the finery she admires. Plainly dressed as she 

must be if she remains honest and retains her virtue, she is scornfully 

ignored by her proud sisters. Everywhere she finds it a generally 

recognized fact that "dress makes the lady." On the street, no one steps 


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