Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

Fashionable Dissipation.--The influence of so important an agent for 

evil in this direction as fashionable dissipation, cannot be ignored. 

By fashionable dissipation we mean that class of excesses in the 

indulgence in which certain classes, usually the more wealthy or 

aristocratic, pride themselves. Among this class of persons a man who 

is known to be a common drunkard would not be recognized; such a person 

would be carefully shunned; yet a total abstainer would be avoided with 

almost equal care, and would be regarded as a fanatic or an extremist 

at least. With persons of this class, wine-drinking is considered 

necessary as a matter of propriety. Along with wine are taken the great 

variety of highly seasoned foods, spices, and condiments in profusion, 

with rich meats and all sorts of delicacies, rich desserts, etc., which 

can hardly be considered much less harmful than stimulants of a more 

generally recognized character. 

 

These indulgences excite that part of the system which generally needs 

restraint rather than stimulation. A participant, an ex-governor, 

recently described to us a grand political dinner given in honor of 

a noted American citizen, which began at 5 P.M., and continued until 

nearly midnight, continuous courses of foods, wines, etc., being served 

for nearly six hours. Similar scenes have been enacted in a score of 

our large cities for the same ostensible purpose. Knowing that public 

men are addicted to such gormandizing on numerous occasions, we do not 

wonder that so many of them are men of loose morals. 

 

The tendency of luxury is toward demoralization. Rome never became 

dissipated and corrupt until her citizens became wealthy, and adopted 

luxurious modes of living. Nothing is much more conducive to sound 

morals than full occupation of the mind with useful labor. Fashionable 

idleness is a foe to virtue. The young man or the young woman who wastes 

the precious hours of life in listless dreaming, or in that sort of 

senseless twaddle which forms the bulk of the conversation in some 

circles, is in very great danger of demoralization. Many of the usages 

and customs of fashionable society seem to open the door to vice, and 

to insidiously, and at first unconsciously, lead the young and 

inexperienced away from the paths of purity and virtue. There is good 

evidence that the amount of immorality among what are known as the 

higher classes is every year increasing. Every now and then a scandal 

in high life comes to the surface; but the great mass of corruption 

is effectually hidden from the general public. Open profligacy is of 

course frowned upon in all respectable circles; and yet wealth and 

accomplishments will cover a multitude of sins. 

 

This freedom allowed to the vile and vicious is one of the worst features 

of fashionable society. Such persons carry about them a moral 

atmosphere more deadly than the dreaded upas-tree. 

 

Round Dances.--Whatever apologies may be offered for other forms of 

the dance as means of exercise under certain restrictions, employed 

as a form of calisthenics, no such excuse can be framed in defense of 


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