Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

"round dances," especially of the waltz. In addition to the associated 

dissipation, late hours, fashionable dressing, midnight feasting, 

exposures through excessive exertions and improper dress, etc., it can 

be shown most clearly that dancing has a direct influence in stimulating 

the passions and provoking unchaste desires, which too often lead to 

unchaste acts, and are in themselves violations of the requirements 

of strict morality, and productive of injury to both mind and body. 

 

Said the renowned Petrarch, "The dance is the spur of lust--a circle 

of which the devil himself is the center. Many women that use it have 

come dishonest home, most indifferent, none better." 

 

We cannot do better than to quote on this subject from a little work 

entitled, "The Dance of Death," the author of which has given a great 

amount of attention to this subject, and presents its evils in a very 

forcible light, as follows:-- 

 

"A score of forms whirl swiftly before us under the softened gaslight. 

I say a score of _forms_--but each is double--they would have made two 

score before the dancing began. Twenty floating visions--each male and 

female. Twenty women, knit and growing to as many men, undulate, sway, 

and swirl giddily before us, keeping time with the delirious melody 

of piano, harp, and violin. 

 

"But draw nearer--let us see how this miracle is accomplished. Do you 

mark yonder couple who seem to excel the rest in grace and ardor. Let 

us take this couple for a sample. He is stalwart, agile, mighty; she 

is tall, supple, lithe, and how beautiful in form and feature! Her head 

rests upon his shoulder, her face is upturned to his; her naked arm 

is almost around his neck; her swelling breast heaves tumultuously 

against his; face to face they whirl, his limbs interwoven with her 

limbs; with strong right arm about her yielding waist, he presses her 

to him till every curve in the contour of her lovely body thrills with 

the amorous contact. Her eyes look into his, but she sees nothing; the 

soft music fills the room, but she hears nothing; swiftly he whirls 

her from the floor or bends her frail body to and fro in his embrace. 

 

"With a last, low wail the music ceases. Her swooning senses come back 

to life. Ah, must it be! Yes; her companion releases her from his embrace. 

Leaning wearily upon his arm, the rapture faded from her eye, the flush 

dying from her cheek--enervated, limp, listless, worn out--she is led 

to a seat, there to recover from her delirium and gather her energies 

as best she may in the space of five minutes, after which she must yield 

her body to a new embrace." 

 

"And now tell me, friend of mine, did you not recognize an old 

acquaintance in the lady we have been watching so closely? No! Then 

believe me; she is no other than the 'pure and lovely girl' you so much 

admired earlier in the evening, the so desirable wife, the angel who 

was to 'haunt your dreams.'" 

 

The author just quoted publishes in his little work a letter from a 

woman of great ability and strength of mind, of unblemished character 


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