Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

INTRODUCTION. 

 

 

Books almost without number have been written upon the subject treated 

in this work. Unfortunately, most of these works are utterly unreliable, 

being filled with gross misrepresentations and exaggerations, and 

being designed as advertising mediums for ignorant and unscrupulous 

charlatans, or worse than worthless patent nostrums. To add to their 

power for evil, many of them abound with pictorial illustrations which 

are in no way conducive to virtue or morality, but rather stimulate 

the animal propensities and excite lewd imaginations. Books of this 

character are usually widely circulated; and their pernicious 

influence is fully as great as that of works of a more grossly obscene 

character. In most of the few instances in which the evident motive 

of the author is not of an unworthy character, the manner of presenting 

the subject is unfortunately such that it more frequently than 

otherwise has a strong tendency in a direction exactly the opposite 

of that intended and desired. The writer of this work has endeavored 

to avoid the latter evil by adopting a style of presentation quite 

different from that generally pursued. Instead of restricting the 

reader's attention rigidly to the sexual function in man, his mind is 

diverted by frequent references to corresponding functions in lower 

animals and in the vegetable kingdom. By this means, not only is an 

additional fund of information imparted, but the sexual function in 

man is divested of its sensuality. It is viewed as a fact of natural 

history, and is associated with the innocence of animal life and the 

chaste loveliness of flowers. Thus the subject comes to be regarded 

from a purely physiological standpoint, and is liberated from the gross 

animal instinct which is the active cause of sensuality. 

 

There are so many well-meaning individuals who object to the agitation 

of this subject in any manner whatever, that it may be profitable to 

consider in this connection some of the principal objections which are 

urged against imparting information on sexual subjects, especially 

against giving knowledge to the young. 

 

I. _Sexual matters improper to be spoken of to the young._ 

 

This objection is often raised, it being urged that these matters are 

_too delicate_ to be even suggested to children; that they ought to 

be kept in total ignorance of all sexual matters and relations until 

nature indicates that they are fit to receive them. It is doubtless 

true that children raised in a perfectly natural way would have no 

sexual thoughts until puberty, at least, and it would be better if it 

might be so; but from facts pointed out in succeeding portions of this 

work, it is certain that at the present time children nearly always 

do have some vague ideas of sexual relations long before puberty, and 

often at a very early age. It is thus apparent that by speaking to 

children of sexual matters in a proper manner, a new subject is not 

introduced to them, but it is merely presenting to them in a true light 

a subject of which they already have vague ideas; and thus, by 


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