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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

satisfying a natural curiosity, they are saved from supplying by their 

imaginations distorted images and exaggerated conceptions, and from 

seeking to obtain the desired information from evil sources whence they 

would derive untold injury. 

 

What reason is there that the subject of the sexual functions should 

be treated with such maudlin secrecy? Why should the function of 

generation be regarded as something low and beastly, unfit to be spoken 

of by decent people on decent occasions? We can conceive of no answer 

except the worse than beastly use to which the function has been so 

generally put by man. There is nothing about the sexual organism which 

makes it less pure than the lungs or the stomach. "Unto the pure all 

things are pure," may have been written especially for our times, when 

there is such a vast amount of mock modesty; when so much pretense of 

virtue covers such a world of iniquity and vice. The young lady who 

goes into a spasm of virtuous hysterics upon hearing the word "leg," 

is perhaps just the one who at home riots her imagination in voluptuous 

French novels, if she commits no grosser breach of chastity. The parents 

who are the most opposed to imparting information to the young are often 

those who have themselves indulged in sexual excesses. In the minds 

of such persons the sexual organs and functions, and everything even 

remotely connected with them, are associated only with ideas of lust 

and gross sensuality. No wonder that they wish to keep such topics in 

the dark. With such thoughts they cannot well bear the scrutiny of 

virtue. 

 

Sexual subjects are not, of course, proper subjects for conversation 

at all times, or at any time in a spirit of levity and flippancy. 

 

II. _Knowledge is dangerous._ 

 

Very true, knowledge is dangerous, but ignorance is more dangerous 

still; or, rather, partial knowledge is more dangerous than a more 

complete understanding of facts. Children, young people, will not grow 

up in innocent ignorance. If, in obedience to custom, they are not 

encouraged to inquire of their parents about the mysteries of life, 

they will seek to satisfy their curiosity by appealing to older or 

better informed companions. They will eagerly read any book which 

promises any hint on the mysterious subject, and will embrace every 

opportunity, proper or improper--and most likely to be the latter--of 

obtaining the coveted information. Knowledge obtained in this 

uncertain and irregular way must of necessity be very unreliable. Many 

times--generally, in fact--it is of a most corrupting character, and 

the clandestine manner in which it is obtained is itself corrupting 

and demoralizing. A child ought to be taught to expect all such 

information from its parents, and it ought not to be disappointed. 

 

Again, while it is true that knowledge is dangerous, it is equally true 

that this dangerous knowledge will be gained sometime, at any rate; 

and as it must come, better let it be imparted by the parent, who can 

administer proper warnings and cautions along with it, than by any other 

individual. Thus may the child be shielded from injury to which he would 


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