Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

or plows the main is no more a living creature than the smallest insect 

or microscopic animalculum. The "big tree" of California and the tiny 

blade of grass which waves at its foot are alike imbued with life. All 

nature teems with life. The practiced eye detects multitudes of living 

forms at every glance. 

 

The universe of life presents the most marvelous manifestations of the 

infinite power and wisdom of the Creator to be found in all his works. 

The student of biology sees life in myriad forms which are unnoticed 

by the casual observer. The microscope reveals whole worlds of life 

that were unknown before the discovery of this wonderful aid to human 

vision,--whole tribes of living organisms, each of which, though 

insignificant in size, possesses organs as perfect and as useful to 

it in its sphere as do animals of greater magnitude. Under a powerful 

magnifying glass, a drop of water from a stagnant pool is found to be 

peopled with curious animated forms; slime from a damp rock, or a speck 

of green scum from the surface of a pond, presents a museum of living 

wonders. Through this instrument the student of nature learns that life 

in its lowest form is represented by a mere atom of living matter, an 

insignificant speck of trembling jelly, transparent and structureless, 

having no organs of locomotion, yet able to move in any direction; no 

nerves or organs of sense, yet possessing a high degree of sensibility; 

no mouth, teeth, nor organs of digestion, yet capable of taking food, 

growing, developing, producing other individuals like itself, becoming 

aged, infirm, and dying,--such is the life history of a living creature 

at the lower extreme of the scale of animated being. As we rise higher 

in the scale, we find similar little atoms of life associated together 

in a single individual, each doing its proper share of the work 

necessary to maintain the life of the individual as a whole, yet 

retaining at the same time its own individual life. 

 

As we ascend to still higher forms, we find this association of minute 

living creatures resulting in the production of forms of increasing 

complicity. As the structure of the individual becomes more complex 

and its functions more varied, the greater is the number of separate, 

yet associated, organisms to do the work. 

 

In man, at the very summit of the scale of animate existence, we find 

the most delicate and wonderfully intricate living mechanism of all. 

In him, as in lower, intermediate forms of life, the life of the 

individual is but a summary of the lives of all numberless minute 

organisms of which his body is composed. The individual life is but 

the aggregate life of all the millions of distinct individuals which 

are associated together in the human organism. 

 

Animals and Vegetables.--The first classification of living creatures 

separates them into two great kingdoms, animals and vegetables. 

Although it is very easy to define the general characteristics of each 

of these classes, it is impossible to fix upon any single peculiarity 


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