Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

which will be applicable in every case. Most vegetable organisms remain 

stationary, while some possess organs of locomotion, and swim about 

in the water in a manner much resembling the movements of certain 

animals. Most vegetables obtain their nutriment from the earth and the 

air, while animals subsist on living matter. A few plants seem to take 

organic matter for food, some even catching and killing small insects. 

 

It is found impossible to draw the precise line between animals and 

vegetables, for the reason just mentioned. The two kingdoms blend so 

intimately that in some cases it is impossible to tell whether a certain 

microscopic speck of life is an animal or a vegetable. But since these 

doubtful creatures are usually so minute that several millions of them 

can exist in a single drop of water, it is usually of no practical 

importance whether they are animal or vegetable, or sometimes one and 

sometimes the other, as they have been supposed to be by some 

biologists. 

 

All living creatures are _organized_ beings. Most possess a structure 

and an organism more or less complicated; but some of the lowest forms 

are merely little masses of a transparent, homogeneous jelly, known 

as protoplasm. Some of the smallest of these are so minute that one 

hundred millions of them could occupy the space of a cube one-thousandth 

of an inch on each side; yet each one runs its course of life as regularly 

as man himself, performing its proper functions even more perfectly, 

perhaps. 

 

Life Force.--To every thinking mind the question often recurs, What 

makes the fragrant flower so different from the dead soil from which 

it grows? the trilling bird, so vastly superior to the inert atmosphere 

in which it flies? What subtle power paints the rose, and tunes the 

merry songster's voice? To explain this mystery, philosophers of olden 

time supposed the existence of a certain peculiar force which is called 

life, or vital force, or vitality. This supposition does nothing more 

than furnish a name for a thing unknown, and the very existence of which 

may fairly be doubted. In fact, any attempt to find a place for such 

a force, to understand its origin, or harmonize its existence with that 

of other well-known forces, is unsuccessful; and the theory of a 

peculiar vital force, a presiding entity present in every living thing, 

vanishes into thin air to give place to the more rational view of the 

most advanced modern scientists, that vital force, so-called, is only 

a manifestation of the ordinary forces of nature acting through a 

peculiar arrangement of matter. In other words, life depends, not upon 

a peculiar force, but upon a peculiar arrangement of matter, or 

organization. It is simply a peculiar manifestation of the force 

possessed by atoms exhibited through a peculiar arrangement of atoms 

and molecules. This arrangement is what is known as organization; and 

bodies which possess it are known as organized or living bodies. The 

term life may be understood as referring to the phenomena which result 

from organization. 


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