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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

exaggeration in elevating them into the proportions of a true 

calamity." 

 

The following is from an eminent physician[25] who for many years 

devoted his whole attention to the diseases of women and lectured upon 

the subject in a prominent medical college:-- 

 

"It is undeniable that all the methods employed to prevent pregnancy 

are physically injurious. Some of these have been characterized with 

sufficient explicitness, and the injury resulting from incomplete 

coitus to both parties has been made evident to all who are willing 

to be convinced. It should require but a moment's consideration to 

convince any one of the harmfulness of the common use of cold ablutions 

and astringent infusions and various medicated washes. Simple and often 

wonderfully salutary as is cold water to a diseased limb, festering 

with inflammation, yet few are rash enough to cover a gouty toe, 

rheumatic knee, or erysipelatous head with cold water.... Yet, when 

in the general state of nervous and physical excitement attendant upon 

coitus, when the organs principally engaged in this act are congested 

and turgid with blood, do you think you can with impunity throw a flood 

of cold or even lukewarm water far into the vitals in a continual stream? 

Often, too, women add strong medicinal agents, intended to destroy by 

dissolution the spermatic germs, ere they have time to fulfill their 

natural destiny. These powerful astringents suddenly corrugate and 

close the glandular structure of the parts, and this is followed, 

necessarily, by a corresponding reaction, and the final result is 

debility and exhaustion, signalized by leucorrhoea, prolapsus, and 

other diseases. 

 

"Finally, of the use of intermediate tegumentary coverings, made of 

thin rubber or gold-beater's skin, and so often relied upon as absolute 

preventives, Madame de Stael is reputed to have said, 'They are cobwebs 

for protection, and bulwarks against love.' Their employment certainly 

must produce a feeling of shame and disgust utterly destructive of the 

true delight of pure hearts and refined sensibilities. They are 

suggestive of licentiousness and the brothel, and their employment 

degrades to bestiality the true feelings of manhood and the holy state 

of matrimony. Neither do they give, except in a very limited degree, 

the protection desired. Furthermore, they produce (as alleged by the 

best modern French writers, who are more familiar with the effect of 

their use than we are in the United States) certain physical lesions 

from their irritating presence as foreign bodies, and also, from the 

chemicals employed in their fabrication, and other effects inseparable 

from their employment, ofttimes of a really serious nature. 

 

"I will not further enlarge upon these instrumentalities. Sufficient 

has been said to convince any one that to trifle with the grand functions 

of our organism, to attempt to deceive and thwart nature in her highly 

ordained prerogatives--no matter how simple seem to be the means 

employed--is to incur a heavy responsibility and run a fearful risk. 


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