Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

maltreatment as well? or, at least, why may she not refuse to lend 

herself to beastly lust? She remains the proprietor of her own body, 

though married; and who is so lost to all sense of justice, equity, 

and even morality, as to claim that she is under any moral obligation 

to allow her body to be abused? 

 

Since the first edition of this work was published, we have many times 

been appealed to by suffering wives in the most pathetic terms. In many 

instances the poor wife was suffering with local disease of a serious 

character, making sexual approaches in the highest degree painful as 

well as repugnant; yet notwithstanding this, the demands of the husband 

for the gratification of his bestial passions were, in many instances, 

in no degree lessened by a knowledge of the facts in the case. 

 

In cases like these it is often a very delicate and exceedingly 

difficult task to point out the duty of the suffering wife and mother. 

The duty of the husband is very plain, and to him the wise physician 

will appeal in a manner which cannot fail to arouse him to a sense of 

his duty if there is yet left unconsumed by the fires of lust even a 

vestige of genuine manhood. 

 

What to Do.--Now to the question as asked by the first parties--married 

people who together seek for a solution of the difficulties arising 

from an abandonment of all protectives against fecundation. The true 

remedy, and the natural one, is doubtless to be found in the suggestion 

made under the heads of "Continence" and "Marital Excesses." By a course 

of life in accordance with the principles there indicated, all of these 

evils and a thousand more would be avoided. There would be less sensual 

enjoyment, but more elevated joy. There would be less animal love, but 

more spiritual communion; less grossness, more purity; less 

development of the animal, and a more fruitful soil for the culture 

of virtue, holiness, and all the Christian graces. 

 

"But such a life would be impossible this side of Heaven." A few who 

claim to have tried the experiment think not. The Shakers claim to 

practice, as well as teach, such principles; and with the potent aids 

to continence previously specified, it might be found less difficult 

in realization than in thought. 

 

A Compromise.--There will be many, the vast majority, perhaps, who will 

not bring their minds to accept the truth which nature seems to teach, 

which would confine sexual acts to reproduction wholly. Others, 

acknowledging the truth, declare "the spirit willing" though "the flesh 

is weak." Such will inquire, "Is there not some compromise by means 

of which we may escape the greater evils of our present mode of life?" 

Such may find in the following facts suggestions for a "better way," 

if not the _best_ way, though it cannot be recommended as wholly free 

from dangers, and though it cannot be said of it that it is not an 

_unnatural_ way:-- 

 

"Menstruation in woman indicates an aptitude for impregnation, and this 

condition remains for a period of six or eight days after the entire 


Page 3 from 6:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   Forward