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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

their own children."[31] 

 

[Footnote 31: Burdach.] 

 

The Greeks practiced infanticide systematically, their laws at one time 

requiring the destruction of crippled or weakly children. Among all 

the various nations, the general object of the crime seems to have been 

to avoid the trouble of rearing the children, or to avoid a surplus, 

objects not far different from those had in view by those who practice 

the same crimes at the present time. 

 

The destruction of the child after the mother has felt its movements 

is termed infanticide; before that time it is commonly known as abortion. 

It is a modern notion that the child possesses no soul or individual 

life until the period of quickening, an error which we have already 

sufficiently exposed. The ancients, with just as much reason, contended 

that no distinct life was present until after birth. Hence it was that 

they could practice without scruple the crime of infanticide to prevent 

too great increase of population. "Plato and Aristotle were advocates 

of this practice, and these Stoics justified this monstrous practice 

by alleging that the child only acquired a soul at the moment when it 

ceased to have uterine life and commenced to respire. From hence it 

resulted that, the child not being animated, its destruction was no 

murder." 

 

The prevalence of this crime will be indicated by the following 

observations from the most reliable sources:-- 

 

"We know that in certain countries abortion is practiced in a manner 

almost public, without speaking of the East, where it has, so to speak, 

entered into the manners of the country. We see it in America, in a 

great city like New York, constituting a regular business and not 

prevented, where it has enriched more than one midwife." 

 

"England does not yield to Germany or France in the frequency of the 

crime of infanticide."[32] 

 

[Footnote 32: Jardien.] 

 

"Any statistics attainable are very incomplete. False certificates are 

daily given by attending physicians. Men, if they are only rich enough, 

die of 'congestion of the brain,' not 'delirium tremens;' and women, 

similarly situated, do not die from the effects of abortion, but of 

'inflammation of the bowels,' etc." 

 

"Infanticide, as it is generally considered (destroying a child after 

quickening), is of very rare occurrence in New York, whereas abortions 

(destroying the embryo before quickening) are of daily habit in the 

families of the best informed and most religious; among those abounding 

in wealth, as well as among the poor and needy."[33] 

 

[Footnote 33: Gardner.] 

 

"Perhaps only medical men will credit the assertion that the frequency 

of this form of destroying human life exceeds all others by at least 

fifty per cent, and that not more than one in a thousand of the guilty 

parties receive any punishment by the hand of civil law. But there is 

a surer mode of punishment for the guilty mother in the self-executing 

laws of nature."[34] 

 

[Footnote 34: Black.] 

 

"From a very large verbal and written correspondence in this and other 


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