Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

 

 

Fashion.--The temptation of dress, fine clothing, costly jewelry, and 

all the extravagances with which rich ladies array themselves, is in 

many cases too powerful for the weakened virtue of poor seamstresses, 

operatives, and servant girls, who have seen so much of vice as to have 

lost that instinctive loathing for it which they may have once 

experienced. Thinking to gain a life of ease, with means to gratify 

their love of show, they barter away their peace of mind for this world, 

all hope for the next, and only gain a little worthless tinsel, the 

scorn of their fellow-creatures, and a host of loathsome diseases. 

 

Lack of Early Training.--It is needless to demonstrate a fact so well 

established as that the future character of an individual depends very 

largely upon his early training. If purity and modesty are taught from 

earliest infancy, the mind is fortified against the assaults of vice. 

If, instead, the child is allowed to grow up untrained, if the seeds 

of vice which are sure to fall sooner or later in the most carefully 

kept ground are allowed to germinate, if the first buds of evil are 

allowed to grow and unfold instead of being promptly nipped, it must 

not be considered remarkable that in later years rank weeds of sin 

should flourish in the soul and bear their hideous fruit in shameless 

lives. 

 

Neglect to guard the avenues by which evil may approach the young mind, 

and to erect barriers against vice by careful instruction and a chaste 

example, leaves many innocent souls open to the assaults of evil, and 

an easy prey to lust. If children are allowed to get their training 

in the street, at the corner grocery, or hovering around saloons, they 

will be sure to develop a vigorous growth of the animal passions. The 

following extract is from the writings of one whose pen has been an 

inestimable blessing to American youth:-- 

 

"Among the first lessons which boys learn of their fellows are 

impurities of language; and these are soon followed by impurities of 

thought.... When this is the training of boyhood, it is not strange 

that the predominating ideas among young men, in relation to the other 

sex, are too often those of impurity and sensuality.... We cannot be 

surprised, then, that the history of most young men is, that they yield 

to temptation in a greater or less degree and in different ways. With 

many, no doubt, the indulgence is transient, accidental, and does not 

become habitual. It does not get to be regarded as venial. It is never 

yielded to without remorse. The wish and the purpose are to resist; 

but the animal nature bears down the moral. Still, transgression is 

always followed by grief and penitence. 

 

"With too many, however, it is to be feared, it is not so. The mind 

has become debauched by dwelling on licentious images, and by 

indulgence in licentious conversation. There is no wish to resist. They 

are not overtaken by temptation, for they seek it. With them the 

transgression becomes habitual, and the stain on the character is deep 

and lasting."[42] 

 

[Footnote 42: Ware.] 

 

Sentimental Literature.--In another connection, we have referred 


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