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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

knowing not what you did, you read a bad book. Do you not remember it 

altogether? Yes! and perhaps you will never get over it. However strong 

and exalted your character, never read a bad book. By the time you get 

through the first chapter you will see the drift. If you find the marks 

of the hoofs of the devil in the pictures, or in the style, or in the 

plot, away with it. 

 

"But there is more danger, I think, from many of the family papers, 

published once a week, in those stories of vice and shame, full of 

infamous suggestions, going as far as they can without exposing 

themselves to the clutch of the law. I name none of them; but say that 

on some fashionable tables there lie 'family newspapers' that are the 

very vomit of the pit. 

 

"The way to ruin is cheap. It costs three dollars to go to Philadelphia; 

six dollars to Boston; thirty-three dollars to Savannah; but, by the 

purchase of a bad paper for ten cents you may get a through ticket to 

hell, by express, with few stopping places, and the final halting like 

the tumbling of the lightning train down the draw-bridge at 

Norwalk--sudden, terrific, deathful, never to rise." 

 

[Footnote 43: T. De Witt Talmage.] 

 

Poverty.--The pressing influence of poverty has been urged as one cause 

of prostitution. It cannot be denied that in many cases, in large cities, 

this may be the immediate occasion of the entrance of a young girl upon 

a life of shame; but it may still be insisted that there must have been, 

in such cases, a deficiency in previous training; for a young woman, 

educated with a proper regard for purity, would sooner sacrifice life 

itself than virtue. Again, poverty can be no excuse, for in every city 

there are made provisions for the relief of the needy poor, and none 

who are really worthy need suffer. 

 

Ignorance.--Perhaps nothing fosters vice more than ignorance. 

Prostitutes come almost entirely from the more ignorant classes, though 

there are, of course, many exceptions. Among the lowest classes, vice 

is seen in its grossest forms, and is carried to the greatest lengths. 

Intellectual culture is antagonistic to sensuality. As a general rule, 

in proportion as the intellect is developed, the animal passions are 

brought into subjection. It is true that very intellectual men have 

been great libertines, and that the licentious Borgias and Medicis of 

Italy encouraged art and literature; but these are only apparent 

exceptions, for who knows to what greater depths of vice these 

individuals might have sunk had it not been for the restraining 

influence of mental culture? 

 

Says Deslandes, "In proportion as the intellect becomes enfeebled, the 

generative sensibility is augmented." The animal passions seem to 

survive when all higher intelligence is lost. We once saw an 

illustration of this fact in an idiot who was brought before a medical 

class in a clinic at Bellevue Hospital, New York. The patient had been 

an idiot from birth, and presented the most revolting appearance, 

seemingly possessing scarcely the intelligence of the average dog; but 

his animal propensities were so great as to be almost uncontrollable. 


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