Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

REPRODUCTION. 

 

As before remarked, reproduction is a function common to all animals 

and to all plants. Every organized being has the power to reproduce 

itself, or to produce, or aid in producing, other individuals like 

itself. It is by means of this function that plants and animals increase 

or multiply. 

 

When we consider the great diversity of characters illustrated in 

animal and vegetable life, and the infinite variety of conditions and 

circumstances under which organized creatures exist, it is not 

surprising that modes of reproduction should also present great 

diversity both in general character and in detail. We shall find it 

both interesting and instructive to consider some of the many different 

modes of reproduction, or generation, observed in different classes 

of living beings, previous to entering upon the specific study of 

reproduction in man. Before doing thus, however, let us give brief 

attention to a theoretical form of generation, which cannot be called 

reproduction, known as 

 

Spontaneous Generation.--By this term is meant the supposed formation 

of living creatures directly from dead matter without the intervention 

of other living organisms. The theory is, in substance, an old one. 

The ancients supposed that the frogs and other small reptiles so 

abundant in the vicinity of slimy pools and stagnant marshes, were 

generated spontaneously from the mud and slime in which they lived. 

This theory was, of course, abandoned when the natural history of 

reptiles became known. 

 

For several thousand years the belief was still held that maggots found 

in decaying meat were produced spontaneously; but it was discovered, 

centuries ago, that maggots are not formed if the flesh is protected 

from flies, since they are the larvae, or young, of a species of this 

insect. A relic of the ancient belief in spontaneous generation is still 

found in the supposition that horse-hair snakes, so-called, are really 

formed from the hairs of horses. This belief is quite common, but 

science long ago exposed its falsity. 

 

When the microscope was discovered it revealed a whole new world of 

infinitesimal beings which were at first supposed to be of spontaneous 

origin; but careful scientific investigation has shown that even these 

mere specks of life are not independent of parentage. M. Pasteur and, 

more recently, Prof. Tyndall, with many other distinguished scientists, 

have demonstrated this fact beyond all reasonable chance for question. 

 

It is, then, an established law that _every living organism originates 

with some previously existing living being or beings_. 

 

It may be queried, If it be true that life is but a manifestation of 

the ordinary forces of matter,--which are common to both dead and living 

matter,--being dependent upon arrangement, then why may it not be that 

dead matter may, through the action of molecular laws, and without the 

intervention of any living existence, assume those peculiar forms of 

arrangement necessary to constitute life, as supposed by the advocates 

of the theory in question? It is true that some who recognize the fact 


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