Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

multiply by division; but before the division occurs, two cells unite 

to form one by a process called _conjugation_. Then, by the division 

of this cell, instead of only two cells, a large number of small cells 

are formed, each of which may be considered as a bud formed upon the 

body of the parent cell and then separated from it to become by growth 

an individual like its parent, and, like it, to produce its kind. In 

this case, we have new individuals formed by the union of two 

individuals which are to all appearance entirely similar in every 

particular. 

 

Sex.--Rising higher in the scale of being, we find that, with rare 

exceptions, reproduction is the result of the union of two dissimilar 

elements. These elements do not, in higher organisms, as in lower forms 

of life, constitute the individuals, but are produced by them; and being 

unlike, they are produced by special organs, each adapted to the 

formation of one kind of elements. The two classes of organs usually 

exist in separate individuals, thus giving rise to distinctions of 

_sex_; an individual possessing organs which form one kind of elements 

being called a male, and one possessing organs for the formation of 

the other kind of elements, a female. The sexual differences between 

individuals of the same species are not, however, confined to the sexual 

organs. In most classes of plants and animals, other sexual differences 

are very great. In some of the lower orders of animals, and in many 

species of plants, the male and female individuals are so much unlike 

that for a long time after they were well known, no sexual relation 

was discovered. 

 

Hermaphrodism.--An individual possessing both male and female organs 

of reproduction is called an _hermaphrodite_. Such a combination is 

very rare among higher animals; but it is by no means uncommon among 

plants and the lower forms of animal life. The snail, the oyster, the 

earth-worm, and the common tape-worm, are examples of true 

hermaphrodites. So-called human hermaphrodites are usually 

individuals in whom the sexual organs are abnormally developed so that 

they resemble those of the opposite sex, though they really have but 

one sex, which can usually be determined with certainty. Only a very 

few cases have been observed in which both male and female organs were 

present. 

 

There is now living in Germany an individual who bears the name of a 

woman; but learned physicians have decided that the person is as much 

man as woman, having the organs of both sexes. What is still more curious, 

this person has the feelings of both sexes, having loved at first a 

man, and afterward a woman. There have been observed, also, a very few 

instances of individuals in whom the sexual organs of neither sex were 

present. It thus appears that a person may be of both sexes or of no 

sex at all. 

 

Sex in Plants.--To one unacquainted with the mysteries of plant life 

and growth, the idea of attaching sexuality to plants seems very 

extraordinary; but the botanist recognizes the fact that the 

distinctions of sex are as clearly maintained in the vegetable as in 


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