Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE. 

 

When the habit and its effects are of very short duration, a cure is 

very readily accomplished, especially in the cases of children and 

females, as in them the evils begun are not continued in the form of 

involuntary pollutions. In cases of longer standing in males, the task 

is more difficult, but still the prospect of recovery is very favorable, 

provided the cooperation of the patient can be secured; without this, 

little can be done. But in these cases the patient may as well be told 

at the outset that the task of undoing the evil work of years of sin 

is no easy matter. It can only be accomplished by determined effort, 

by steady perseverance in right doing, and in the application of 

necessary remedies. Those who have long practiced the vice, or long 

suffered severely from its effects, have received an injury which will 

inevitably be life-long to a greater or lesser extent in spite of all 

that can be done for them. Yet such need not despair, for they may 

receive inestimable benefit by the prevention of greater damage, which 

they are sure to suffer if the disease is allowed to go unchecked. 

 

Cure of the Habit.--The preliminary step in treatment is always to cure 

the vice itself if it still exists. The methods adopted for this purpose 

must differ according to the age of the individual patient. 

 

_In children_, especially those who have recently acquired the habit, 

it can be broken up by admonishing them of its sinfulness, and 

portraying in vivid colors its terrible results, if the child is old 

enough to comprehend such admonitions. In addition to faithful warnings, 

the attention of the child should be fully occupied by work, study, 

or pleasant recreation. He should not be left alone at any time, lest 

he yield to temptation. Work is an excellent remedy; work that will 

really make him very tired, so that when he goes to bed he will have 

no disposition to defile himself. It is best to place such a child under 

the care of a faithful person of older years, whose special duty it 

shall be to watch him night and day until the habit is thoroughly 

overcome. 

 

In younger children, with whom moral considerations will have no 

particular weight, other devices may be used. Bandaging the parts has 

been practiced with success. Tying the hands is also successful in some 

cases; but this will not always succeed, for they will often contrive 

to continue the habit in other ways, as by working the limbs, or lying 

upon the abdomen. Covering the organs with a cage has been practiced 

with entire success. A remedy which is almost always successful in small 

boys is circumcision, especially when there is any degree of phimosis. 

The operation should be performed by a surgeon without administering 

an anaesthetic, as the brief pain attending the operation will have 

a salutary effect upon the mind, especially if it be connected with 

the idea of punishment, as it may well be in some cases. The soreness 

which continues for several weeks interrupts the practice, and if it 

had not previously become too firmly fixed, it may be forgotten and 


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