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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

and yet for years he had been a constant sufferer from nocturnal 

emissions until his manhood was nearly lost, evidently the result of 

the mental onanism which he had practiced without imagining the 

possibility of harm. 

 

But it is not true that control of the thoughts is impossible. Thoughts 

are the result of the action of the brain; and the action of the brain 

may be controlled as well as the movements of a voluntary muscle. It 

may be more difficult, especially when the resolution is weakened, as 

it is by this vice; but so long as there are left any remnants of will 

and reason, control is possible. To strengthen the will must be one 

of the objects of mental treatment, and exercise is the method by which 

it may be accomplished. The thing for a sufferer to say, is not, "I 

can't," but, "I can and I will control my thoughts." Suggestions which 

will aid in accomplishing this have already been given under the heading, 

"Cure of the Habit." 

 

We cannot forbear to add a word further respecting the worth of religion 

in aiding these sufferers. If there is any living creature who needs 

the help of true religion, of faith in God, in Christ, and in the 

efficacy of prayer, it is one of these. If there is any poor mortal 

who can not afford to be deprived of the aid of a sympathizing Saviour, 

it is one who has enervated his will, degraded his soul, and depraved 

his body by the vile habit of self-abuse. A compassionate Redeemer will 

succor even these defiled ones, if they truly "hunger and thirst" after 

purity, and if they set about the work of reforming themselves in good 

earnest, and with right motives. 

 

Exercise.--Physical exercise is a most powerful aid to pure thoughts. 

When unchaste ideas intrude, engage at once in something which will 

demand energetic muscular exercise. Pursue the effort until fatigued, 

if necessary, making, all the while, a powerful mental effort to control 

the mind. Of course, evil thoughts will not be expelled by thinking 

of them, but by displacing them by pure thoughts. Exercise aids this 

greatly. 

 

Exercise is also essential to balance the circulation, and thus relieve 

congestion of internal organs. Sedentary persons especially need 

systematic exercise. No single form of exercise is so excellent as 

walking. Four or five miles a day are none too many to secure a proper 

amount of muscular exercise. Gymnastics, the "health-lift," "Indian 

clubs," "dumb-bells," rowing, and other forms of exercise are all good; 

but none of them should be carried to excess. Ball-playing is likely 

to be made a source of injury by exciting, in vigorous competition, 

too violent and spasmodic action. 

 

Daily exercise should be taken to the extent of fatigue. It is better 

that those who are still strong enough should have some regular 

employment which will secure exercise. Those who prefer may secure 

exercise and recreation in the pursuit of some study that involves 

necessary physical exertion; as, botany, geology, or entomology. The 

collection of natural-history specimens is one of the most pleasant 

diversions, and may be made very useful as well. 


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