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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

habits. The father had used neither liquor nor tobacco in any form. 

The mother could give no light on the matter, and we were obliged to 

rest for the time being upon the conviction which fastened itself upon 

us that the cases before us were most marked illustrations of the 

results of self-abuse begun at a very early age. The mother thought 

it impossible that our suspicions could be correct, saying that she 

had watched her sons with jealous care from earliest infancy and had 

seen no indications of any error of the sort. But we had not long to 

wait for confirmation of our view of the case, as they were soon caught 

in the act, to which it was found that they were greatly addicted, and 

the mystery was wholly solved. 

 

Every possible remedy was used to check the terrible disease which was 

preying upon the unfortunate boys, but in vain. At times the symptoms 

would be somewhat mitigated, and the most sanguine hopes of the fond, 

watching mother would be excited, but in vain. The improvement always 

proved to be but temporary, and the poor sufferers would speedily 

relapse into the same dreadful condition again, and gradually grew 

worse. At last, the poor mother was obliged to give up all hope, in 

utter despair watching the daily advances of the awful malady which 

inch by inch destroyed the life, the humanity, the very mind and soul 

of her once promising sons. Sadly she took them back to her Western 

home, there to see them suffer, perhaps for years before death should 

kindly release them, the terrible penalty of sin committed almost 

before they had arrived at years of responsibility. 

 

How these mere infants learned the vice we were never able to determine. 

We have no doubt that opportunities sufficient were presented them, 

as the parents seemed to have very little appreciation of danger from 

this source. Had greater vigilance been exercised, we doubt not that 

the discovery of the vice at the beginning would have resulted in the 

salvation of these two beautiful boys, who were sacrificed upon the 

altar of concupiscence. Two or three years after we first saw the cases, 

we heard from them, and though still alive, their condition was almost 

too horrible for description. Three or four similar cases have come 

to our knowledge. 

 

Boys, are you guilty? Think of the fearful fate of these boys, once 

as joyous and healthy as you. When you are tempted to sin, think of 

the fearful picture of the effects of sin which they present. Have you 

ever once dared to commit this awful sin? Stop, never dare to do the 

thing again. Take a solemn vow before God to be pure. Your fate may 

be as sad, your punishment as terrible. No one can tell what the results 

may be. Absolute purity is the only safe course. 

 

 

A Prodigal Youth.--A. M., son of a gentleman of wealth in Ohio, early 

acquired the evil practice which has ruined so many bright lads. He 

was naturally an intelligent and prepossessing lad, and his father gave 

him as good an education as he could be induced to acquire, affording 

him most excellent opportunities for study and improvement. But the 


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