Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

vile habit which had been acquired at an early age speedily began its 

blighting influence. It destroyed his taste for study and culture. His 

mind dwelt upon low and vile subjects. He grew restless of home 

restraint and surroundings, and finally left the parental roof. 

Wandering from city to city he grew rapidly worse, sinking into deeper 

depths of vice, until finally he became a base, besotted, wretched 

creature. Broken down in health by his sins, he could no longer enjoy 

even the worst sensual pleasures, and with no taste for or capability 

of appreciating anything higher he was most wretched indeed. The poor 

fellow now fell into the hands of quacks. His kind father sent him money 

in answer to his pitiful appeals for help, and he went anxiously from 

one to another of the wretched villains who promise relief to such 

sufferers but only rob them of their money and leave them worse than 

before. 

 

At last, in total despair of everything else, the poor fellow came to 

us. He seemed quite broken-hearted and penitent for his sins, and really 

appeared to want to lead a better life if he could only be made well 

again. We faithfully pointed out to him the dreadful wickedness of his 

course, and the fact that a cure could only be effected by the most 

implicit obedience to all of nature's laws during his whole future life. 

Indeed, we were obliged to inform him of the sad fact that he could 

never be as well as before, that he must always suffer in consequence 

of his dreadful course of transgression. We gave him a most earnest 

exhortation to begin the work of reform where alone it could be 

effectual, by reforming his heart, and the tears which coursed down 

his sin-scarred cheeks seemed to indicate true penitence and a real 

desire to return to the paths of purity and peace. 

 

Earnestly we labored for this young man, for months, employing every 

means in our power to lift him from the slough of sin and vice upon 

the solid pathway of virtue and purity again. Gradually the hard lines 

on his face seemed to lessen in intensity. The traces of vice and crime 

seemed to be fading out by degrees. We began to entertain hopes of his 

ultimate recovery. But alas! in an evil moment, through the influence 

of bad companions, he fell, and for some time we lost sight of him. 

A long time afterward we caught a glimpse of his bloated, sin-stained 

face, just as he was turning to skulk away to avoid recognition. Where 

this poor human wreck is now leading his miserable existence we cannot 

say, but have no doubt he is haunting the dens of iniquity and sin in 

the cities, seeking to find a little momentary pleasure in the 

gratification of his appetites and passions. A hopeless wreck, with 

the lines of vice and crime drawn all over his tell-tale countenance, 

he dares not go home, for he fears to meet the reproachful glance of 

his doting mother, and the scornful looks of his brothers and sisters. 

We never saw a more thoroughly unhappy creature. He is fully conscious 

of his condition; he sees himself to be a wreck, in mind, in body, and 


Page 6 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   Forward