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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

harm has been wrought which it will require the work of years to undo. 

The young man we have referred to made indeed a narrow escape, but no 

one can safely run such a risk. Even he must suffer all his life the 

consequences of a few years of sin. 

 

A Lost Soul.--M. M., of ----, was the son of a mechanic in humble 

circumstances. He was an only child, and his parents spared no pains 

to do all in their power to insure his becoming a good and useful man. 

Good school advantages were given him, and at a proper age he was put 

to learn a trade. He succeeded fairly, and their hopes of his becoming 

all that they could desire were great, when he suddenly began to 

manifest peculiar symptoms. He had attended a religious revival and 

seemed much affected, professing religion and becoming a member of a 

church. To the exercises of his mind on the subject of religion his 

friends attributed his peculiar actions, which soon became so strange 

as to excite grave fears that his mind was seriously affected. At times 

he was wild, showing such unmistakable evidences of insanity that even 

his poor mother, who was loth to believe the sad truth, was forced to 

admit that he was deranged. 

 

After a few months a change came over him which encouraged his friends 

to think that he was recovering. He became quiet and tractable, never 

manifesting the furious symptoms before observed. But the deception 

was only temporary, for it was soon evident that the change was simply 

the result of the progress of the disease and denoted the failure of 

the mental powers and the approach of imbecility. In this condition 

was the young man when he came under our care. We felt strongly impressed 

from our first examination of the case that it was one of sexual abuse; 

but we were assured by his friends in the most emphatic manner that 

such was an impossibility. It was claimed that the most scrupulous care 

had been bestowed upon him, and that he had been so closely watched 

that it was impossible that he should have been guilty of so gross a 

vice. His friends were disposed to attribute his sad condition to 

excessive exercise of mind upon religious subjects. 

 

Not satisfied with this view of the case, we set a close watch upon 

him, and within a week his nurse reported that he had detected him in 

the act of self-pollution, when he confessed the truth, not yet being 

so utterly devoid of sense as to have lost his appreciation of the 

sinfulness of the act. When discovered, he exclaimed, "I know I have 

made myself a fool," which was the exact truth. At this time the once 

bright and intelligent youth had become so obtuse and stupid that he 

appeared almost senseless. His face wore an idiotic expression which 

was rarely lighted up by a look of intelligence. It was only by the 

greatest exertion that he could be made to understand or to respond 

when spoken to. In whatever position he was placed, whether lying, 

sitting, or standing, no matter how constrained or painful, he would 

remain for hours, staring vacantly, and fixed and immovable as a statue. 


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