Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

 

 

An Indignant Father.--A case came to our knowledge through a gentleman 

who brought his daughter to us for treatment for the effects of 

self-abuse, of a father who adopted a summary method of curing his son 

of the evil practice. Having discovered that the lad was a victim of 

the vile habit, and having done all in his power by punishment, threats, 

and representations of its terrible effects, but without inducing him 

to reform, the father, in a fit of desperation, seized the sinful boy 

and with his own hand performed upon him the operation of castration 

as he would have done upon a colt. The boy recovered from the operation, 

and was of course effectually cured of his vile habit. The remedy was 

efficient, though scarcely justifiable. Even a father has no right thus 

to mutilate his own son, though we must confess that the lad's chances 

for becoming a useful man are fully as good as they would have been 

had he continued his course of sin. 

 

Disgusted with Life.--T. A. was a young man of promise, the son of 

ambitious parents, proud-spirited, and without respect for religion. 

While still quite young he enlisted in the service of the government, 

and after a time rose to the position of an officer in the U. S. army. 

Having in boyhood acquired the habit of self-abuse, he had stimulated 

his passions without restraint, and was readily led still farther 

astray by the evil companions with whom he was surrounded. He indulged 

his passions in every way and on every occasion when he found 

opportunity, and speedily began to feel the effects of his vices. Before 

he was fully aware of his condition, he found himself being literally 

devoured by the vilest of all diseases, which only those who transgress 

in this manner suffer. The disease made rapid advances and speedily 

reduced him to a condition of almost absolute helplessness. He was 

obliged to obtain a furlough; but his vital forces were so nearly 

exhausted that he did not rally even under skillful treatment; and when 

his furlough expired, he was still in the same pitiable condition. 

Getting it extended for a time, he by accident came under our care, 

and by the aid of very thorough treatment he was in a measure improved, 

though the progress of the disease was simply stayed. When apprized 

of his real condition, he exhibited much agitation, walking nervously 

about his room, and finally exclaimed that he was utterly disgusted 

with life anyway, and after a few weeks or months more of suffering 

he should blow his brains out and end his misery. He had no fears of 

death, he said, and we presume that he could not imagine it possible 

that there was any greater suffering in store for him than he already 

endured. We pitied the poor fellow from the bottom of our heart. He 

had natural qualities which ought to have made him distinguished. He 

might have risen high in the world of usefulness. Now he was compelled 

to look back upon a short life of squandered opportunities, a pathway 

stained with vice, memories of vile debaucheries which had wasted his 

youth and broken his constitution. Wretched was he indeed. 


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