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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

body, they are said to be absorbed. Some physiologists claim that they 

are composed of a substance identical with nerve tissue, and that by 

absorption they play a very important part in the development and 

maintenance of the nervous system. 

 

It is asserted by good authorities that the reproductive element in 

man is not so well developed as to be really fit for the reproduction 

of the species before the age of twenty-four or twenty-five. After the 

age of forty-five or fifty, the reproductive elements deteriorate in 

quality, and become again unfitted for vigorous procreation. 

 

The fully developed zoosperms are suspended in a transparent, 

gelatinous fluid, which, mingled with the secretion of the prostate 

gland and other fluids which it meets during its expulsion from the 

body, constitutes the _semen_. 

 

The Ovum.--The female element of generation, the ovum, is produced by 

an organ called the _ovary_, of which there are two in each individual. 

In size and form, the ovary closely resembles the testicle. Like the 

latter organ, also, it is formed within the body early in the process 

of development; but instead of passing outward and downward, as does 

the testicle, it remains within the abdominal cavity, suspended in 

place by ligaments. It is connected with a duct which receives the ovum 

as it is discharged, and conveys it to the uterus. 

 

The human ovum varies in size from 1/240 to 1/120 of an inch in diameter, 

and consists of a single cell. Ova are not formed in such large numbers 

as zoosperms. As a general rule, in the human female, a single ovum 

is developed and discharged once in about four weeks, during the period 

of sexual activity. 

 

Fecundation.--It is often asked, and the question has elicited some 

discussion, Which is the principal reproductive element; the zoosperm, 

or the ovum? The ancients supposed the male element to be the essential 

element, being simply nourished and developed by the female; but modern 

research in biological science does not sustain this view. Probably 

neither one enjoys especial preeminence; for neither can undergo 

complete development without the other. In very rare cases, the ovum 

has been observed to undergo a certain amount of development of itself; 

but a perfect individual can be produced only by the union of the two 

kinds of elements, which process is known as _fecundation_. The instant 

this union occurs, the life of a new individual begins. All the changes 

which result between that moment and the birth of the individual are 

those of development only. Indeed, the same existence continues from 

the instant of the union of the two elements, not only until birth, 

but through growth, the attainment of maturity, the decline of life, 

and even until death. 

 

It is interesting to observe the different methods by which fecundation 

is effected, both in plants and animals, for this is a process common 

to both. 

 

Fecundation in Flowers.--The great naturalist, Linnaeus, was the first 

to explain the reproductive process in plants. He tells us that "the 


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