Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

flower forms the theater of their amours; the calyx is to be considered 

as the nuptial bed; the corolla constitutes the curtains; the anthers 

are the testes; the pollen, the fecundating fluid; the stigma of the 

pistil, the external genital aperture; the style, the vagina, or the 

conductor of the prolific seed; the ovary of the plant, the womb; the 

reciprocal action of the stamens on the pistil, the accessory process 

of fecundation." 

 

Thus marvelous is the analogy between the reproductive organs and their 

functions in plants and animals. Through this one vital process we may 

trace a close relation between all the forms of life, from the humblest 

plant, or even the mere specks of life which form the green scum upon 

a stagnant pool, to man, the masterpiece of creation, the highest of 

all animated creatures. In all the realm of Nature there can be found 

no more remarkable evidences of the infinite skill and wisdom of the 

Creator of all things. 

 

In many instances the action of plants seems almost to be prompted by 

intelligence. At the proper moment, the corolla contracts in such a 

way as to bring the stamens nearer to the stigma, or in contact with 

it, so as to insure fecundation. In some aquatic plants the flowers 

elevate themselves above the surface of water while the process of 

fecundation is effected; submerging themselves again immediately 

afterward. 

 

Other very curious changes occur in flowers of different species during 

the reproductive act. The stigma is observed to become moistened, and 

even to become distinctly odorous. Often, too, it becomes intensely 

congested with the juices of the plant, and sometimes even acquires 

an uncommon and most remarkable degree of contractility. This is the 

case with the stigma of the tulip and one variety of sensitive plant, 

and is in these plants observed to occur not only after the application 

of the pollen to the stigma, but when excited by any other means of 

stimulation. The flowers of some plants, during and after fecundation, 

also show an increase of heat, in some cases so marked as to be readily 

detected with the thermometer. This is said to be the case with the 

_arum_ of Italy. 

 

In some plants in which the pistil is longer than the stamens, thus 

elevating the stigma above the anthers, the female organ is often 

observed to bend over and depress itself so as to come within reach 

of the anthers. 

 

In most instances the fecundation of flowers is chiefly effected 

through a purely mechanical process, though in these cases also we see 

a wonderful adaptation of parts to conditions. 

 

When the male and female parts of flowers are situated on different 

plants, as is the case in the willow, the poplar, the melon vine, and 

many other species, the pollen of the male flower is wafted by the wind 

or gentle breeze to the stigma of the female flower, which will usually 

be found at no very great distance, although fertilization may take 

place in this way at very considerable distances. Bees, moths, and many 

other species of insects, serve a very important purpose in this work, 


Page 5 from 6:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   Forward