Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

transporting the fertilizing dust upon their wings, antennae, 

sucking-tubes, and feet. Small birds, and even the humble snail, which 

would scarcely be credited with any useful function, are also very 

serviceable in the same direction. The part performed by insects in 

the reproductive process of many plants is so great that they have been 

very poetically termed "the marriage priests of flowers." 

 

Nature provides for thorough fecundation in these cases by placing the 

plants which bear the male and the female flowers near each other. This 

fact accounts for the unproductiveness of certain varieties of 

strawberries unless mixed with plants of some other variety, it being 

well known to nursery-men that some varieties produce only the female 

parts of flowers. 

 

Modes of Fecundation in Animals.--The modes by which fecundation is 

effected in animals are still more various and wonderful than in plants. 

In some of the lower animals, as in most fish and reptiles, both elements 

are discharged from the bodies of the parents before coming in contact, 

there being no contact of the two individuals. In this class of animals 

the process is almost wholly analogous to fecundation in those plants 

in which the male and female flowers are on different plants or 

different parts of the same plant. In the female fish, a large number 

of ova are developed at a certain season of the year known as the 

spawning season. Sometimes the number reaches many thousands. At the 

same time, the testicles of the male fish, which are contained within 

the abdominal cavity, become distended with developed zoosperms. When 

the female seeks a place to deposit her eggs, the male closely follows; 

and as she drops them upon the gravelly bottom, he discharges upon them 

the zoosperms by which they are fecundated. The process is analogous 

to some species of frogs. When the female is about to deposit her eggs, 

the male mounts upon her back and rides about until the eggs are all 

deposited, discharging upon them the fertilizing spermatozoa as they 

are laid by the female. 

 

In higher orders of animals, fecundation takes place within the 

generative organs of the female by contact between the male and the 

female organs. To effect this, there are necessitated certain accessory 

organs, the _penis_ in the male and the _vagina_ in the female. 

 

Nothing in all the range of nature is more remarkable than the 

adaptation of the two varieties of sexual organs in each species. This 

necessary provision is both a powerful means of securing the 

perpetuation of the species, and an almost impassable barrier against 

amalgamation. 

 

The act of union, or sexual congress, is called _coitus_ or _copulation_. 

It is accompanied by a peculiar nervous spasm due to excitement of 

special nerves principally located in the _penis_ in the male, and in 

an extremely sensitive organ, the _clitoris_, in the female. The 

nervous action referred to is more exhausting to the system than any 

other to which it is subject. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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