Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

way improved as much as possible. They are to become the men and women 

of the next generation, when their fathers and mothers have retired 

from active life. Twenty years from to-day the world will be just what 

the present boys and girls shall make it. Boys who are chaste, honest, 

obedient, and industrious, will become useful and noble men, husbands, 

and fathers. Girls who are pure, innocent, and dutiful, will become 

honored and lovely women, wives, and mothers. 

 

Boys and girls are placed in families together, and thus are evidently 

designed by nature to associate together, to obtain their education 

and preparation for life together. When secluded wholly from each 

other's society, both suffer a loss. But while this is true, it is also 

true that certain evils may and often do grow out of the association 

of the two sexes of young people, so serious in character that many 

wise and good men and women have felt that the sexes should be reared 

and educated apart as much as possible. These evils are the result of 

too intimate and improper associations of boys and girls. Associations 

of this sort must be most sedulously avoided. Boys and girls who are 

in school together must be extremely careful to avoid too close 

associations. On all occasions a modest reserve should be maintained 

in the deportment of the young of both sexes toward each other. Too 

early friendships formed often lead to hasty marriages, before either 

party is prepared to enter into the married state, and before the 

judgment has been sufficiently developed to make either capable of 

selecting a suitable partner for life. These facts are usually learned 

when it is too late for the information to be of any value. 

 

Parents and teachers are especially responsible for guarding these 

early associations and giving timely warning when needed. The youth 

should always be ready to take advice on this subject, for with their 

inexperience they cannot know their wants so well as do their elders. 

Nothing is more disgusting to persons of sound sense than youthful 

flirtations. Those misguided persons who encourage these indiscretions 

in young people do an immense amount of injury to those whom they ought 

to be prepared to benefit by wise counsel. We have seen promising young 

people made wretched for life through the influence of one of these 

mischief-makers, being most unhappily mated, and repenting too late 

of a hasty marriage for which they were utterly unprepared. 

 

Young persons often labor under the erroneous impression that in order 

to be agreeable they must talk "small talk;" this literally means, 

"silly twaddle," which disgusts everybody, and yet which all seek to 

imitate. Whenever the two sexes meet in society or elsewhere, as at 

all other times, the conversation should be turned upon subjects of 

real interest, which admit of the exercise of sound sense and will be 

a means of culture. Such associations do not result in injury to any 

one, and may be the means of much profit; but nothing is more execrable 

than the frivolous, silly, often absolutely senseless observations 


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