Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

 

 

Union of the Ovum and Zoosperm.--The zoosperms not only come in contact 

with the ovum, but penetrate the thin membrane which incloses its 

contents, and enter its interior, where they disappear, becoming united 

with its substance. In the ova of certain fishes, small openings have 

been observed through which the spermatozoa find entrance. Whether such 

openings exist in human ova is an undecided question; but it is probable 

that they do. 

 

Curious Modes of Reproduction.--A peculiar kind of reproduction is 

observed in a variety of polyp, a curious animal which very much 

resembles a shrub in appearance. It attaches itself to some solid object, 

and then, as it grows, sends out little protuberances resembling buds. 

Some of these separate and fall off, swimming about as separate animals. 

These never become like the parent polyp; but they lay eggs, which hatch, 

and become stationary polyps like their grandparent, and in their turn 

throw off buds to form swimming polyps. In this case we have two kinds 

of generation combined, alternating with each other. 

 

Plant-lice afford a curious illustration of a similar generation. Males 

and females unite and produce eggs. The creatures produced by the 

hatching of eggs are neither males nor perfect females. They are 

_imperfect females_. They are all alike, so that no sexual union occurs. 

Instead of laying eggs, they produce live young like themselves, which 

appear to be developed from internal buds similar to the external buds 

of the polyp. After this method of reproduction has continued for eight 

or ten generations, a few perfect individuals appear, and the first 

process is repeated. 

 

The common honey-bee affords another illustration like the last. A 

virgin queen sometimes lays eggs, which always produce males, or drones. 

After union with a male, she lays eggs in the royal cells which become 

perfect females like herself. She also seems to have the power to lay, 

at will, unfecundated eggs, from which drones are produced. 

 

Human Beings Are Developed Buds.--It has been very aptly suggested by 

an eminent physiologist that the ovum and zoosperm may be correctly 

considered as internal buds. Thus it would appear that generation is 

universally a process of budding. A child is but a compound bud, an 

offshoot from its parents. This idea is not a mere fancy, but has a 

scientific basis. As all the exquisite details of the most beautiful 

flower are in essence contained within the tiny bud which first makes 

its appearance, so is the developed human being, the full-grown man 

or woman, virtually contained within the tiny cell called the ovum after 

it has been impregnated or fecundated by the zoosperms. In short, men 

and women are blossoms in a strictly scientific sense. 

 

Fecundation in Hermaphrodites.--The process of fecundation in 

hermaphrodite animals is very peculiar. In some cases, as in the snail, 

the union of two individuals is usually necessary, though each 

possesses both kinds of organs. In other cases, as in the tape-worm, 

the oyster, and numerous other mollusks, a single individual has the 


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