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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

power to fertilize its own ova, thus being wholly independent. Human 

hermaphrodites are usually so deformed that fecundation is not effected, 

which is a fortunate safeguard against the multiplication of such 

monstrosities. 

 

Development.--After the union of the two elements, known as fecundation 

or _conception_, if the conditions are favorable, development occurs, 

and the little germ is in due process of time developed into an 

individual which is an exact counterpart of its parents. During this 

developmental process, the embryonic being is variously treated by 

different classes of animals. 

 

Unprotected Development.--Most fishes and reptiles discharge their ova 

before fecundation, or soon after, and pay no further attention to them. 

The fish deposits its eggs in a little hollow scooped out in the gravelly 

bed of a stream, or sows them broadcast upon the waters. The turtle 

buries its eggs in the sand, and leaves them to be hatched by the sun. 

The ostrich disposes of her eggs in the same way. Many other species 

of animals pay no regard to the protection of the germs which are 

destined, if placed under favorable conditions, to become individuals 

like themselves. 

 

Partial Protection of the Ovum.--There are some exceptions, however, 

to this general rule among fishes and reptiles. Even fishes manifest 

a degree of parental solicitude in certain cases. The male of a species 

of South American fish gathers up the eggs after fecundation has taken 

place, and carries them in his mouth until they are hatched. Another 

male fish carries the eggs of his mate in a little pouch upon the lower 

and posterior part of his body. 

 

Certain species of frogs carry their eggs wound about their legs; others 

suspend them from the abdomen. Another variety carries its young upon 

its back. Prof. Wyman describes a "swamp toad" which patiently takes 

the eggs of his mate, one by one, and fastens them upon her back, 

observing great regularity in arrangement. These several devices are 

evidently for the purpose of protecting, in some degree, the young 

individual during the helpless stage of its existence. 

 

Development in the Higher Animals and Man.--Higher animals are less 

prolific, and their development is a more complicated process; hence, 

their young need greater protection, and, for this reason, the ova, 

instead of being discharged from the body of the female after 

fecundation, are retained.[3] As we have seen that a suitable 

receptacle is sometimes provided outside of the body, so now a 

receptacle is needed, and is provided in the interior of the body of 

the female. This receptacle is called 

 

[Footnote 3: Curious examples of internal development sometimes occur 

in animals which usually deposit eggs. Snakes have been known to produce 

both eggs and living young at the same time. At the annual meeting of 

the American Society for the Advancement of Science, at Detroit, Mich., 

in August, 1875, we had the pleasure of examining a specimen, exhibited 

by Prof. Wilder, of a chick which had undergone a considerable degree 


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