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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

in the lower animals we have numerous examples in which the permanent 

condition of the individual is the same as some one of the stages through 

which man passes in the process of development. The same author 

previously quoted makes the following interesting statements:-- 

 

"The webbed feet of the seal and ornithorhynchus typify the period when 

the hands and feet of the human embryo are as yet only partly subdivided 

into fingers and toes. Indeed, it is not uncommon for the 'web' to 

persist to some extent between the toes of adults; and occasionally 

children are born with two or more fingers or toes united to their tips. 

 

"With the seal and the walrus, the limbs are protruded but little beyond 

the wrist and ankle. With the ordinary quadrupeds, the knee and elbow 

are visible. The cats, the lemurs, and the monkeys form a series in 

which the limbs are successively freed from the trunk, and in the 

highest apes they are capable of nearly the same movements as the human 

arm and leg, which, in their development, passed through all these 

stages." 

 

Simplicity of Early Structures.--The first structures formed are 

exceedingly simple in form. It is only by slow degrees that the great 

complicity which characterizes many organs is finally attained. For 

example, the heart is at first only a straight tube. By enlargement 

and the formation of longitudinal and transverse partitions, the fully 

developed organ is finally produced. The stomach and intestines are 

also at first but a simple straight tube. The stomach and large 

intestine are formed by dilatation; and by a growth of the tube in length 

while the ends are confined, the small intestines are formed. The other 

internal organs are successively developed by similar processes. 

 

The Stages of Growth.--At first insignificant in size--a simple cell, 

the embryonic human being steadily increases in size, gradually 

approximating more and more closely to the human form, until, at the 

end of about nine calendar months or ten lunar months, the new 

individual is prepared to enter the world and begin a more independent 

course of life. The following condensation of a summary quoted by Dr. 

Austin Flint, Jr., will give an idea of the size of the developing being 

at different periods, and the rate of progress:-- 

 

At the end of the third week, the embryon is a little less than 

one-fourth of an inch in length. 

 

At the end of the seventh week, it is three-fourths of an inch long. 

The liver, lungs, and other internal organs are partially formed. 

 

At the eighth week, it is about one inch in length. It begins to look 

some like a human being, but it is impossible to determine the sex. 

 

At the third month, the embryon has attained the length of two to two 

and one-half inches. Its weight is about one ounce. 

 

At the end of the fourth month, the embryon is called a fetus. It is 

from four to five inches long, and weighs five ounces. 

 

At the fifth month, the fetus is nearly a foot long, and weighs about 

half a pound. 

 

At the sixth month, the average length of the fetus is about thirteen 


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