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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

inches, and its weight one and a half to two pounds. If born, life could 

continue a few minutes. 

 

At the seventh month, the fetus is from fourteen to fifteen inches long, 

and weighs two to three pounds. It is now viable (may live if born). 

 

At the eighth month, the length of the fetus is from fifteen to sixteen 

inches, and its weight from three to four pounds. 

 

At the ninth month, the fetus is about seventeen inches long, and weighs 

from five to six pounds. 

 

At birth, the infant weighs a little more than seven pounds, the usual 

range being from four to ten pounds, though these limits are sometimes 

exceeded. 

 

Duration of Gestation.--The length of time required for the development 

of a human being is usually reckoned as about forty weeks. A more precise 

statement places it at about two hundred and seventy-eight days. This 

limit is often varied from. Cases have occurred in which a much longer 

time has been required, and numberless cases have occurred in which 

human beings have been born several weeks before the expiration of the 

usual time, as stated. There is some uncertainty respecting the exact 

length of the period of gestation, which grows out of the difficulty 

of determining, in many cases, the exact time when conception takes 

place. 

 

Uterine Life.--The uterine life of the new individual begins with the 

impregnation of the ovum, which occurs the instant it is brought in 

contact with the zoosperms of the male. While in the uterus, the young 

life is supported wholly by the mother. She is obliged to provide not 

only for her own sustenance, but for the maintenance of her child. And 

she must not only eat for it, but breathe for it as well, since it 

requires a constant and adequate supply of oxygen before birth as much 

as afterward. 

 

How the Unborn Infant Breathes.--Oxygen and nutriment are both supplied 

to it through the medium of an organ called the _placenta_, which is 

a spongy growth composed almost entirely of blood-vessels, and is 

developed upon the inner wall of the uterus, at the point at which the 

ovum attaches itself after fecundation. The growing fetus is connected 

with this vascular organ by means of a sort of cable, called the 

_umbilical cord_. The cord is almost entirely composed of blood-vessels 

which convey the blood of the fetus to the placenta and return it again. 

The fetal blood does not mix with that of the mother, but receives oxygen 

and nourishment from it by absorption through the thin walls which alone 

separate it from the mother's blood. 

 

The umbilical cord contains no nerves, as there is no nervous connection 

between the mother and the child. The only way in which the child can 

be influenced by the mother is through the medium of the blood, to 

changes in which it is very susceptible, as we shall see more clearly 

hereafter. 

 

The cord is attached to the body of the child at the point called the 

_navel_, being cut off at birth by the _accoucheur_. With the placenta, 

it is expelled soon after the birth of the child, and constitutes the 

shapeless mass familiarly known as the _after-birth_, by the retention 


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