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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

Heredity.--The phenomena of heredity are among the most interesting 

of biological studies. It is a matter of common observation that a child 

looks like its parents. It even happens that a child resembles an uncle 

or a grandparent more nearly than either parent. The same peculiarities 

are often seen in animals. 

 

The cause of this resemblance of offspring to parents and ancestors 

has been made a subject of careful study by scientific men. We shall 

present the most recent theory adopted, which, although it be but a 

theory, presents such an array of facts in its support, and explains 

the phenomena in question so admirably, that it must be regarded as 

something more than a plausible hypothesis. It is the conception of 

one of the most distinguished scientists of the age. The theory is known 

as the doctrine of _pangenesis_, and is essentially as follows:-- 

 

It is a fact well known to physiologists that every part of the living 

body is made up of cellular elements which have the power to reproduce 

themselves in the individual, thus repairing the damage resulting from 

waste and injury. Each cell produces cells like itself. It is further 

known that there are found in the body numerous central points of growth. 

In every group of cells is found a central cell from which the others 

originated, and which determines the form of their growth. Every minute 

structure possesses such a center. A simple proof of this fact is found 

in the experiment in which the spur of a cock was grafted upon the ear 

of an ox. It lived in this novel situation eight years, attaining the 

length of nine inches, and nearly a pound in weight. A tooth has been 

made to grow upon the comb of a cock in a similar manner. The tail of 

a pig survived the operation of transplanting from its proper position 

to the back of the animal, and retained its sensibility. Numerous other 

similar illustrations might be given. 

 

The doctrine of pangenesis supposes that these centers of nutrition 

form and throw off not only cells like themselves, but very minute 

granules, called gemmules, each of which is capable, under suitable 

circumstances, of developing into a cell like its parent. 

 

These minute granules are scattered through the system in great numbers. 

The essential organs of generation, the testicles in the male and the 

ovaries in the female, perform the task of collecting these gemmules 

and forming them into sets, each of which constitutes a reproductive 

element, and contains, in rudimentary form, a representative of every 

part of the individual, including the most minute peculiarities. Even 

more than this: It is supposed that each ovum and each zoosperm contains 

not only the gemmules necessary to reproduce the individuals who 

produced them, but also a number of gemmules which have been transmitted 

from the individuals' ancestors. 

 

If this theory be true,--and we can see no sound objection to it,--it 

is easy to understand all the problems of heredity. The gemmules must 

be very small indeed, but it may be suggested that the molecules of 

matter are smaller still, so this fact is no objection to the theory. 


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