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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
REPRODUCTION-1
REPRODUCTION-2
REPRODUCTION-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-1
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-2
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-3
ANATOMY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-1
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-2
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-3
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-4
THE SEXUAL RELATIONS-15
CHASTITY-1
CHASTITY-2
CHASTITY-3
CONTINENCE
MARITAL EXCESSES-1
MARITAL EXCESSES-2
MARITAL EXCESSES-3
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-1
PREVENTION OF CONCEPTION:ITS EVILS AND DANGERS-2
INFANTICIDE AND ABORTION
THE SOCIAL EVIL-1
THE SOCIAL EVIL-2
THE SOCIAL EVIL-3
SOLITARY VICE-1
SOLITARY VICE-2
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-1
RESULTS OF SECRET VICE-2
EFFECTS IN FEMALES
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-1
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-2
CURATIVE TREATMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF SELF-ABUSE-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-1
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-2
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-3
A CHAPTER FOR BOYS-4
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-1
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-2
A CHAPTER FOR GIRLS-3
INDEX

 

It will be seen, then, that each spermatozoon, or zoosperm, actually 

contains, in an embryonic condition, every organ and tissue of the 

individual producing it. The same is true of the ovum. In other words, 

the reproductive elements are complete representatives, in miniature, 

of the parents, and contain all the elements for producing an offspring 

possessing the same peculiarities as the parents. Various modifying 

circumstances sufficiently explain the dissimilarities between 

parents and children. 

 

This theory is strikingly confirmed by the fact, previously mentioned, 

that in certain cases the ovum alone, a single reproductive element, 

may undergo a degree of development approaching very near to completion. 

It is supposed that fecundation is chiefly necessary to give to the 

gemmules the requisite amount of nourishment to insure development. 

 

As we shall see hereafter, this matter has a very important bearing 

upon several practical questions. 

 

Ante-Natal Influences.--There can be no manner of doubt that many 

circumstances which it is entirely within the power of the parents to 

supply, exert a powerful influence in molding both the mental and the 

physical characteristics of offspring. By carefully availing himself 

of the controlling power given him by a knowledge of this fact, the 

stock-raiser is enabled to produce almost any required quality in his 

young animals. Pigeon fanciers show wonderful skill in thus producing 

most curious modifications in birds. The laws of heredity and 

development are carefully studied and applied in the production of 

superior horses, cows, dogs, and pigeons; but an application of the 

same principles to the improvement of the human race is rarely thought 

of. Human beings are generated in as haphazard and reckless a manner 

as weeds are sown by the wind. No account is taken of the possible 

influence which may be exerted upon the future destiny of the new being 

by the physical or mental condition of parents at the moment when the 

germ of life is planted, or by the mental and physical conditions and 

surroundings of the mother while the young life is developing. Indeed, 

the assertion of a modern writer that the poor of our great cities 

virtually "spawn children," with as little thought of influences and 

consequences as the fish that sow their eggs broadcast upon the waters, 

is not so great an exaggeration as it might at first sight appear to 

be. 

 

Law Universal.--Men and women are constantly prone to forget that the 

domain of law is universal. Nothing comes by chance. The revolutions 

of the planets, studied by the aid of the telescope, and the gyrations 

of the atoms, seen only by the eye of science, are alike examples of 

the controlling influence of law. Notwithstanding this sad ignorance 

and disregard of this vitally important subject, the effects of law 

are only too clearly manifested in the crowds of wretched human beings 

with which the world is thronged. An old writer sagely remarks, "It 

is the greatest part of our felicity to be well born;" nevertheless, 


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